Bret Easton Ellis: 'I'm No 'Trump Apologist'



Bret Easton Ellis, the outspoken author of “American Psycho,” says he’s being falsely trashed as a “Trump apologist” and supporter of Russia for merely “defending the American voter.”

The controversial novelist also says he’s through discussing politics because the blowback is “too much insanity.”

“Last night I had dinner in West Hollywood with a few friends and a couple I had never met before and I was surprised that by the end of the dinner the majority of the table (mostly Hollywood insiders) admitted they were supporting Donald Trump for president,” Ellis said on his Facebook page.

“When I got back home I tweeted about this at 11 p.m. (on a Saturday night — who is even listening??) thinking it was just mildly interesting and no one would pay much attention.

“I was shocked today to see that the tweet had been liked and re-tweeted as much as it had been — re-tweeted in fact by Donald Trump himself.”

Those tweets, one of which was accompanied by a photo of a young Trump holding a white dove, said:

Of the tweets, “this was just an observation I made and not necessarily an endorsement,” Ellis, 53, said on Facebook.

“It was a shock that announced itself to me culminating in a week in which I had run into many people in LA who were Trump supporters, suggesting that, yet again, the national media had gotten this narrative completely wrong: their hope is not, apparently, the reality. That is all.”

In February, Ellis told the Irish Examiner that he didn’t vote for Trump, but “the hysteria is bothering me a lot more than the reality of what he’s doing.”

Then, in March, he lashed out at Hollywood liberals and their “childish meltdowns” over Trump, charging they are blaming their own neuroses on the president.

In a 35-minute podcast, Ellis said coastal elites are testing his patience.

“You can dislike the fact that Trump was elected, yes, definitely, and yet still understand and accept ultimately that he was elected this time around. Or you can have a complete mental and emotional collapse and let the Trump presidency define you, which I think is absurd,” Ellis said.

“If you are still losing your s*** about Trump, I think you should probably go to a shrink and not let the bad man that was elected define your self-victimization and your life. You are letting him win.

“Barbra Streisand says she’s gaining weight because of Trump. Lena Dunham says she’s losing weight because of Trump. Really? You’re blaming the president for your own problems and neuroses?”

He also ripped into Oscar-winner Meryl Streep for using her Golden Globe speech in January to talk about Trump instead filmmakers who she had worked with and had passed away, such as Mike Nichols and Nora Ephron.

“Or especially what it was like playing Carrie Fisher in ‘Postcards from the Edge,’ since Fisher had died just two weeks earlier,” Ellis said.

“Streep used this moment to go on an anti-Trump rant for 10 minutes on national TV instead of eulogizing her friend … Again, [she was] reinstating the moral superiority of the left and ignoring aesthetics in place of ideology.”

Ellis, burst onto the literary scene in 1985 — when he was 21 and studying at Bennington College — with his bestseller “Less Than Zero,” which chronicles a rich university student who goes on a series of drug-, booze- and sex-fueled romps through Los Angeles.

In 1991, he published “American Psycho,” about a young Manhattan investment banker who is also a serial killer — a book condemned by many for its stomach-turning scenes of carnage. It was later turned into an R-rated movie and a Broadway musical.


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